Update/Patch Notes Hidden Proof 0.999=1 Encrypted Picture

  • #1
    I originally discovered this and posted a thread on the forums but within 5min my posted deleted, made a second post asking why deleted. This post is holding up, yall might want to read before it gets deleted.

    http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/6232903755?page=1
  • #2
    The picture cropped from his thread


    Regardless I think its meant more to just drive people a little crazy. They posted a long time ago as a joke http://us.blizzard.com/en-us/company/press/pressreleases.html?id=2843583
    as sixen pointed out
  • #3
    I seem to be behind on this topic, but wouldn't that negate everything that our current mathematics curriculum
    teaches about limits?
  • #4
    Read the forum guidelines. Your topic is in all caps - And if it asks or implies any response from "Blue" or "blizzard" it will be locked. Also, you cannot bump threads. And beyond this ; it's a joke post - It's old.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/CrazyPoochification - Let's Play of Eastern Sun/Other stuff
  • #5
    Gotta love blizzard and their easter eggs xD Saw this one ages ago linked in some wowhead comment or something, recognised it immediately :)

    The current thread he linked isn't in caps btw..
  • #6
    Quote from MarsMouth

    I seem to be behind on this topic, but wouldn't that negate everything that our current mathematics curriculum
    teaches about limits?


    Three thirds is 1. :)
  • #7
    Quote from MarsMouth

    I seem to be behind on this topic, but wouldn't that negate everything that our current mathematics curriculum
    teaches about limits?

    The idea is that infinitely close to 1 is really just 1 and just "get over it".

    It's really one of those things that math teachers use to make sure they never ever get laid. The discussion/concept serves very little real purpose.
  • #8
    Technically .999 does not equal 1. However, .999... does equal 1. It's a subtle difference in notation, but you need the decimal to be repeating.

    Regardless, there are some really interesting ways to prove it out there.

    For further reading/curiosity:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0.999...
    67.1k elite kills :: 1.98m total kills :: p255
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  • #9
    Doesn't break anything. Is (moderately) useful because it gives a good understanding of what our mathematical system is and how it functions, I would say it is important for new students who are taking mathematical theory in University to understand this very point, as it's one of the simplest and easiest to prove math facts that is almost unbelievable but fundamentally true. In math when we talk about infinitesimal we are literally talking about a value which is indistinguishable from 0. (Note that for the same reason 0.000...1 is effectively 0.)

    In fact integration is the act of summing an infinite number of infinitely small objects. Sometimes it's just plain elegant how this stuff actually works.
  • #10
    That maths is old, I learnt it when I was like 12, and I'm sure it has been around a lot longer than I have been alive. Seems a bit weird for them to include it, doesn't really seem to effect anything... Maybe they just hired an intern for a couple weeks and he got into the file and added his mark :P
  • #11
    Quote from lorien1973

    Quote from MarsMouth

    I seem to be behind on this topic, but wouldn't that negate everything that our current mathematics curriculum
    teaches about limits?

    The idea is that infinitely close to 1 is really just 1 and just "get over it".

    It's really one of those things that math teachers use to make sure they never ever get laid. The discussion/concept serves very little real purpose.


    Except that the number 'infinitely close to' 1 is 1. The underlying concept is called a Dedekind Cut, and defines the real numbers.

    So...

    <shades>

    it serves a very real purpose indeed.


    YEEEEEEEAH!
  • #12

    (Note that for the same reason 0.000...1 is effectively 0.)

    That's not even a valid number. You can't add additional numbers after the ... as the entire point is that it repeats indefinitely.

    Anyway, .999... does equal 1. Exactly 1. Not "effectively" or "approximately". It is simply another way of writing the exact same number. I've seen people try to argue that 1-.999... = .000...1, but again this is a nonsense number. If you subtract a number from itself, you get 0.

    It's well established in mathematics that there are infinitely many rational numbers within any real interval of non-zero length (anyone with a B.S in math should know this.) Based on that fact, if .999... and 1 were different numbers, you should be able to name a rational number in the interval, other than 1. Of course, you cannot. Name any number less than 1 and it is quite obvious that it cannot be greater than .999...
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